BEAT ZODERER

Zwischen Kalkül und Zufall
Nov 24 – Jan 26 2013
von Bartha, Basel

ZWISCHEN KALKÜL UND ZUFALL Installation view, 2012 von Bartha, Basel
Betonguss No. 3, 2012 Concrete 69 x 57 cm
ZWISCHEN KALKÜL UND ZUFALL Installation view, 2012 von Bartha, Basel
ZWISCHEN KALKÜL UND ZUFALL Installation view, 2012 von Bartha, Basel
ZWISCHEN KALKÜL UND ZUFALL Installation view, 2012 von Bartha, Basel
ZWISCHEN KALKÜL UND ZUFALL Installation view, 2012 von Bartha, Basel

With his many-facetted works, which seek to go beyond the con­straints of the clas­si­cal vocab­u­lary of art forms, Beat Zoderer is one of the Swiss artists that have found inter­na­tional recog­ni­tion. His works have been shown all over the world in renowned venues. In his objects, wall pieces, instal­la­tions and sculp­tures, he the­ma­tizes a non­cha­lant com­bi­na­tion of “high” and “low”. The past is reflected upon with­out sen­ti­men­tal­iz­ing, while the tra­di­tional canons of art are newly inter­preted in a sub­ver­sive and refresh­ing man­ner. Thus he decon­structs and vitalises con­crete and con­struc­tive art by sub­tly lever­ag­ing out its rig­or­ous­ness, its ratio­nal­ity and its perfectionism. On the premises of the von Bartha Garage Beat Zoderer (born in Zurich in 1955, resid­ing and work­ing in Wet­tin­gen) is show­ing new works, among them a spec­tac­u­lar instal­la­tion made out of plex­i­glas balls. Addi­tion­ally, he is pre­s­en­ing two groups of works that oscil­late between the poles of inten­tion and coin­ci­dence and in the het­ero­gene­ity of their for­mal solu­tions empha­sise the poetry of the mate­r­ial used. Beat Zoderer explores the pos­si­bil­i­ties of the mate­r­ial, pos­ing for­mal ques­tions that lead to inge­nious and ironic visual expe­ri­ences. It is strik­ing how he mate­ri­alises his ideas with authen­tic and direct ges­tures and how he indulges in his enthu­si­asm for lumi­nous colours – often in ready-made mate­r­ial from a depart­ment store – or for the diverse char­ac­ter­is­tics of the mate­r­ial. Thus, his works do not seek to decline a strict set of art forms com­pletely – which would call to mind the objec­tiv­ity and per­fec­tion­ism of min­i­mal­ism – but attempt instead to show how and out of what they have orig­i­nated. Mak­ing the con­struc­tion vis­i­ble, its imper­fec­tion, is an essen­tial char­ac­ter­is­tic of Zoderer’s 30-year work phi­los­o­phy. Small sur­face irreg­u­lar­i­ties or so-called “sur­prises” are part of the cre­ativeen­tion process and an inte­gral part of a work – a sub­jec­tiv­ity that rel­a­tivises the puris­tic core and allows an endear­ing look at the mate­r­ial, infus­ing it with a kind of soul.